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March 14, 2011

Get the Picture? Renewable Energy and the Smart Grid



It was late 2010, when founder of Intelligent Communications Partners (News - Alert), Jon Arnold, announced that a new study was to be released about renewable energy, authored by renowned management consulting firm, Boston Consulting Group. The study looked at the prospects for seven classes of renewable energy: advanced biofuels, electric vehicles, concentrated solar power, solar photovoltaic power, onshore wind, offshore wind, and carbon capture and storage for coal.

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Boston Consulting Group’s analysis speaks to the timeliness for each of these alternative energies coming onstream, some of which are closer to being market-ready than others. The main message to take away from the report is the dilemma facing the energy sector. All of these sources are viable under the right conditions, and there clearly is exciting innovation going on. However, on the other hand, there presents a greater challenge; while these alternative forms of energy are fairly easy to generate, getting them to market is not. These forms are generally not located near the existing transmission grid, or cannot be effectively stored.

Now, Zpryme Research & Consulting, as well as ICP Strategies is taking another look at these renewable energies in a study titled, “Renewable Energy and the Smart Grid.” The report includes an extensive set of forecasts for each segment of renewable energy from 2010 – 2015, covering wind, solar, hydro, geothermal and biomass. Complementing this is a strategic analysis of each segment, along with a macro level assessment of market trends, opportunities, new business models, and conclusions around paths to success.

The market opportunity for renewable energy in the U.S. is substantial, but faces a mix of immediate and long-term challenges. With their report, Zpryme Research & Consulting and ICP Strategies, are hoping to set the stage for any company looking to understand where and how renewable energy fits into the larger picture of smart grid.


Jaclyn Allard is a TMCnet Web Editor. She most recently worked on the production team at Juran Institute, a quality consulting firm producing its own training and marketing materials. Previously, she interned at Curbstone Press, a nonprofit publishing press in Willimantic, CT, and fulfilled the role of Editor-in-Chief for the literature and arts journal published by the University of Connecticut. To read more of her articles, please visit her columnist page.

Edited by Jaclyn Allard
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